Juicing Your Way to Health

DID YOU KNOW?

A main difference between juicing and blending is the thickness of the juice. A blender’s blades mix pulp and juice together, whereas most juicers use centrifugal force to separate juice from solids, producing a thinner liquid. With a juicer, you can use whole fruits and vegetables, including small seeds, skins and rinds. When using a blender, remove peels (though some skins, such as apple and pear, can be left on), rinds and seeds — anything you don’t want to end up in your belly. 

Recipes. From “The Everything Juicing Book” by Carole Jacobs, Patrice Johnson and Nicole Cormier (Adams Media, March 2010):

- Popeye’s Secret: 2 kale leaves, 1 beet top and greens, 1 fist of spinach, 1 / 2 cup broccoli florets. All of these vegetables contain Vitamin C, an antioxidant that may help reduce the risk of cancer. 

- Salad in a Glass: 1 cup broccoli, 3 butterhead lettuce leaves, 1 carrot, 2 red radishes, 1 green onion. Broccoli is rich in Vitamin K, which helps blood clot normally.

- Garlic Delight: 3 Roma tomatoes, 2 red apples, 1 clove garlic, 1 sprig Italian parsley. Tomatoes and parsley are both good sources of vitamins A, C and K and of potassium, which helps keep blood pressure in check.


3 USES FOR LEFTOVER PULP FROM YOUR JUICER

Add it to foods such as casseroles, soups and meatloaf. 

Eat it just as is; it’s pure fiber. 

Chuck it on the compost pile. 


3 THINGS YOU SHOULD NOT PUT IN A JUICER

Citrus peels. The pungent, bitter oils will overshadow the taste of the juice. 

Pits. Remove the hard pits from cherries, peaches and other stone fruits to avoid damaging the blades. 

Your fingers. Always use the food pusher to avoid contact with the ultra-sharp bla
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