illeism

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What does it mean to speak in third person?
Third person = "the absent": someone who is neither speaking nor being spoken to. These terms are used to classify words according to who they refer to: as you mention in the question, when it comes to pronouns, I and we belong to the first person, you to the second, and he/she/it/they to the third person

In everyday speech
Illeism in everyday speech can have a variety of intentions depending on context. One common usage is to impart humility, a common practice in feudal societies and other societies where honorifics are important to observe ("Your servant awaits your orders"), as well as inmasterslave relationships ("This slave needs to be punished"). Recruits in the military, mostlyUnited States Marine Corpsrecruits, are also often made to refer to themselves in the third-person, such as "the recruit," in order to reduce the sense of individuality and enforce the idea of the group being more important than the self. The use of illeism in this context imparts a sense of lack of self, implying a diminished importance of the speaker in relation to the addressee or to a larger whole. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illeism

JESUS, THE SON OF GOD SAID:

John 14:15-21 King James Version (KJV)

15 If ye love me, keep my commandments.

16 And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter...

[Illeism = What is ILLEISM? It is the act of referring to oneself in the third grammatical person instead of first person. Illeism is the tendency in some individuals to refer to themselves in the third person. Because Jesus never exalted Himself, He OFTEN spoke of Himself in the Third Person. A person who is known for his or her illeism is an illeist, who speaks illeistically. Illeism is the habit of referring to oneself in the third person. Strictly speaking it refers to excessive use of the pronoun he, because it derives from ille, its Latin equivalent. That's why it's said like illy-ism. Illeism is most often employed as a literary device, and writers use it for a variety of purposes. Illeism is sometimes used in literature as a stylistic device. in or referring to such a grammatical person or linguistic form: “He,” “she,” “it,” and “they” are third person pronouns, singular and plural, nominative case. An illeist is someone who refers to himself in the third person. Speaking in the third person "is a classic technique used by generations of Bollywood scriptwriters to establish a character’s aristocracy, power and gravitas.". What does it mean to speak in third person? Third person = "the absent": someone who is neither speaking nor being spoken to. These terms are used to classify words according to who they refer to: as you mention in the question, when it comes to pronouns, I and we belong to the first person, you to the second, and he/she/it/they to the third person. Word History: It is a little odd to create an English word out of a pronoun (nouns, verbs, and adjectives are usually objects of our borrowing) but illeism is based on the Latin third person singular pronoun ille "he" (illa "she", illud "it"). We see the remnants of ille and illa today in words like French il "he" and elle "she" and Spanish él and ella. The word originally meant "that" and, just as unaccented that became the in English, Latin ille and illa became "the" in French (le, la) and Spanish el, la. Writing in third person is writing from the third person point of view and uses pronouns like he, she, it, or they. It differs from the first person, which uses pronouns such as I and me, and from the second person, which uses pronouns such as you and yours. In grammatical terms, first person, second person, and third person refer to personal pronouns. Narration is the use of—or the particularly chosen methodology (Illeism) or process of using—a written or spoken commentary to convey a story to an audience. Christ was referring to Himself as the Comforter His Father would send to replace His visible presence with Christ's Spirit - His omnipresent Spirit! Able to be present everywhere! It was expedient for Him to go back to Heaven - so he could return and be present everywhere by His own Spirit/Presence instead of limited to His human form and only able to be in one place at a time. This is part of what makes Christ intricately like His Father and His God = "omnipresent". Only NOW "invisible", "unseen", "withdrawn from the eye of sense"....ect...living INSIDE of everyone who loves and obeys His Words)

Another major case of third person titles that intrigues me is in John 17 where Jesus is praying and refers to himself as God's son and 'Jesus Christ':

1After Jesus said this, he looked toward heaven and prayed:

  "Father, the hour has come. Glorify your Son, that your Son may glorify you. 2For you granted him authority over all people that he might give eternal life to all those you have given him. 3Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent. 4I have brought you glory on earth by finishing the work you gave me to do. 5And now, Father, glorify me in your presence with the glory I had with you before the world began."]
,

...that he may abide with you for ever;

17 Even the Spirit of truth; whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth him not, neither knoweth him: but ye know him; for he dwelleth with you, and shall be in you.  (Example of Jesus speaking in third person = called "illeism")

18 I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.

19 Yet a little while, and the world seeth me no more; but ye see me: because I live, ye shall live also.

20 At that day ye shall know that I am in my Father, and ye in me, and I in you.

21 He that hath my commandments (WORD of GOD), and keepeth them, he it is that loveth me: and he that loveth me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself to him" John 14:15-21 (KJV).


Learn more about "Third Person" definition here
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