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Isaiah 9:6 Jesus the MIGHTY GOD?

Jesus the Mighty God?

The Son of GOD is strong enough to defeat His enemies by becoming vulnerable, transparent and humble. It is the only hope the human race has for turning hostility into friendship. Isn’t that true in your own life?

 

An Examination of Isaiah 9:6

 

Let us first of all consider the fact that the opening phrase of Isaiah 9:6 states:

 

“For unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given…”

 

Please ask yourself the following question:

 

“Since the verse says ‘a Son is given,’ who did the giving?”

 

Someone did the giving, and someone was given. Although this is easily overlooked, it is very revealing and sets the tone for the remainder of the verse.

 

One of the most common verses that are brought up by Christians to prove that JESUS is GOD or in other words they try to prove that Jesus is His Own Father, by saying that HE (JESUS) IS THE ONE AND ONLY WISE GOD is that of Isaiah 9:6. In fact this verse is supposedly one of the strongest evidences that Jesus is God.

 

So with that said let us see what Isaiah 9:6 says:

 

For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor,The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace. 


In the ensuing list of epithets given to the Son, we do not run into a perceived problem until we reach “The mighty El.” Therefore, let us address this.

 

Being called El or Elohim (or mighty) is not limited to Yahweh in Scripture. For example, see Psalm 82, esp. v 6, where it is used in reference to judges. Thus, we see that elohim can be used of people who are in mighty positions of authority, but that doesn’t make them the Almighty. Yahshua too, can be considered a mighty one, an El.

 

Let us also consider the word “mighty,” which is translated from the Hebrew word gibbowr (Strong’s H1368).

 

The definition from Strong’s Dictionary is as follows:

 

mighty = H1368. gibbowr, ghib-bore'; or (short.)  gibbor, ghib-bore'; intens. from the same as H1397; powerful; by impl. warrior, tyrant.

KJV:--champion, chief, X excel, giant, man, mighty (man, one), strong (man), valiant man.

 

As shown, the Hebrew word gibbowr is defined as “powerful,” and has been translated using words such as “mighty,” “strong,” and “valiant.”

 

Taking these facts into consideration, this epithet could easily be translated “powerful El” or “strong El.”

 

By the way, gibbowr appears in Scripture more than 150 times, and in the vast majority of those occurrences, it is used in reference to man (source: Englishman’s Concordance).

 

The Article “The

 

Especially with the article “The” in the text (“The mighty God” and “The everlasting Father”) as it appears in the KJV, it makes it sound that much more to the surface reader that this text does indeed make the Son TheAlmighty Father. Many translations, however, leave out the article “the,” including the NKJV, NIV, RSV, NASB, and possibly many others. For example, here is the verse as it appears in the New King James Version(NKJV), again with the Hebrew El in place of “God”:

 

Isa 9:6 (NKJV)

For unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given; and the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty El, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

 

The Son can be (and is indeed) a mighty El. No problem. Being mighty, however, does not make Him the Almighty.

 

Isaiah 9:6 is wrapped up with the final epithet assigned unto this Son. He is also called “Prince of Peace.” This is yet another piece of evidence within this very verse that the Son is not the Father. A prince is the son of a Father.

 

Cp Acts 5:31 (Peter speaking)

Him [i.e., Yahshua] Yahweh has exalted to His right hand to be Prince and Savior, to give repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins.

 

In the end, Isaiah 9:6 can be taken in harmony with the rest of the overwhelming* amount of verses proving that Yahweh is the Almighty and Yahshua is His Son. There is harmony here, but we have to be willing to lay down the pre-conceived notions that the Son is a second person in what is commonly called a “triune Godhead” or that He is the Father in a different mode (i.e., the Oneness doctrine).

 

So here we see a prophecy being made about the Messiah, the Messiah that is to come for the Israelite people. Now the Christian contends that Jesus is God because the Messiah is called the mighty God, hence that must mean he is God.

 

At face value it might seem that the Messiah is indeed called God, yet a careful examination of the verse shows that the text does NOT refer to Jesus as God. Rather when we do analyse the text, we find that the text has been mistranslated by the Trinitarians, something very common.

 

As we all know Isaiah was an Israelite prophet, and the book of Isaiah was written in Hebrew, therefore we should go to the Hebrew and see what the actual term of mighty God is in the Hebrew language.

 

When we do consult the Hebrew language we find that in Hebrew the term mighty God is as follow:

 

 el Gibbor

 

Now what does the word ?el mean in Hebrew? Does the word ?el in Hebrew refer to the mighty and true God alone, such as Yahweh? Well let us see the definition of the word ?el:

 

1) god, god-like one, mighty one

a) mighty men, men of rank, mighty heroes

b) angels

c) god, false god, (demons, imaginations)

d) God, the one true God, Jehovah

2) mighty things in nature

3) strength, power

 

So notice, the word ?el can refer to mighty men, men of high rank, and angels. Hence the word el does not exclusively mean the one and true God.

 

In fact if one reads Ezekiel chapter 31 verse 11 we see that a tyrannical king is called mighty God:

 

10 Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD; Because thou hast lifted up thyself in height, and he hath shot up his top among the thick boughs, and his heart is lifted up in his height;  11 I have therefore delivered him into the hand of the mighty one (?el) of the heathen

 

If one goes and consults the Hebrew one will find that the term used here is IDENTICAL to that of Isaiah 9:6.

 

Notice how the translators now translate mighty God, ?el, as mighty one! Why the convenient change? Why in Isaiah 9:6 do they put mighty God, and in Ezekiel they put might one?

 

To make matters worst the exact phrase el' Gibbor is used in the plural in Ezekiel 32 verse 12, we read:

 

12 By the swords of the mighty will I cause thy multitude to fall, the terrible of the nations, all of them: and they shall spoil the pomp of Egypt, and all the multitude thereof shall be destroyed

 

As the Christian ministry of Biblical gospel writes:


The phrase translated "Mighty God" in Isaiah 9:6 in the NIV in the Hebrew, el gibbor. That very phrase, in the plural form, is used Ezekiel 32:21 where dead "heroes" and mighty men are said, by the 
figure of speech personification, to speak to others. The phrase in Ezekiel is translated "mighty leaders" in the NIV, and "the strong among the mighty" in the KJV and NASB. The Hebrew phrase, when used in the singular, can refer to one "mighty leader" just as when used in the plural it can refer to many "mighty leaders."


So thus we have established that the term mighty God, ?el gibbor is not an exclusive name or term for God alone.

So therefore we must ask ourselves on what basis have the Trinitarian scholars mischievously translated the term into Mighty God, god with a capital G as if to refer to the true and all mighty God.

       

Bible verses that warn us not to add/subtract from Biblical Revelations

Revelation and Deuteronomy Says:


Rev. 22:18 For I testify to everyone who hears the words of the prophecy of this book: If anyone adds to these things, God will add to him the plagues that are written in this book; 19 and if anyone takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part from the Book of Life, from the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book.

Deut. 4:2 "You shall not add to the word which I command you, nor take from it, that you may keep the commandments of the LORD your God which I command you."


No Jew ever believed that the Messiah would be God, and no where in the context of Isaiah chapter 9 is such a doctrine taught. The context of Isaiah 9 is about the Messiah and what he will do, as the ministry of the Gospel:


The context illuminates great truth about the verse, and also shows that there is no justification for believing that it refers to the 
Trinitybut rather to God's appointed ruler. The opening verse of the chapter foretells a time when "there will be no more gloom for those in distress." All war and death will cease, and "every warrior's boot.will be destined for burning" (v. 5). How will this come to pass? The chapter goes on: "for to us a child is born and to us a son is given" (v. 6). There is no hint that this child will be "God," and reputable Trinitarian scholars will assert that the Jews of the Old Testament knew nothing of an "incarnation." For them, the Messiah was going to be a man anointed by God. He would start as a child, which of course Yahweh, their eternal God, could never be. And what a great ruler this man would grow to be: "the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty Hero, Father of the Coming Age, Prince of Peace." Furthermore, "he will reign on David's throne (v. 7), which could never be said of God. God could never sit on David's throne. But God's Messiah, "the Son of David," could (Matt. 9:27, et al). Thus, a study of the verse in its context reveals that it does not refer to the Trinity at all, but to the Messiah, the son of David and the Son of God.

  

So therefore a more accurate translation of Isaiah 9:6 should call the Messiah a mighty hero, or the mighty Son of God and the Son of David (man), or a mighty god, god with a small g, which means a righteous servant or a mighty prophet. The Trinitarians have NO BASIS in translating ?el Gibbor as mighty GOD with a capital G.


So in conclusion Isaiah 9:6 proves nothing for a Trinitarian who believes in the divinity of Jesus. In fact I would say that Isaiah 9:6 is one of the WEAKEST arguments and position a Trinitarian can rely on.


Make no mistake, JESUS is DIVINE, but He is NOT His Father and GOD. Jesus is truly and literally the Son of God. Jesus was TWICE BORN, once in Heaven of the Spirit, prior to being born in the flesh in Bethlehem.


 

Since the King James Version rendition of this verse is probably by far the most popular, let us begin by quoting Isaiah 9:6 from this version (the Hebrew El has been inserted in place of “God”):

 

Isa 9:6 (KJV)

For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty El, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.

 

In this verse, two major issues need to be examined:

 

1)      The Name: By giving several epithets which the Son will be called, does this verse discount the personal name of the Son?

 

2)      Is the Son the Almighty?: Do the epithets “The mighty El” and “The everlasting Father” show that the Son is really the Father and that He is the Almighty?

 

 

 

There are several things mentioned in this verse describing what the Son will be called. As alluded to above, these are epithets—

 

epithet: “a characterizing word or phrase accompanying or occurring in place of the name of a person or thing.”

 

-- “epithet,” Merriam-Webster Dictionary

(http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/epithet)

 

Isaiah 9:6 is conveying that the one who comes will have these qualities and attributes. Other texts agree. Consider the following:

 

The NIV omits “name” and simply states, “And he will be called”—

 

Isa 9:6 NIV

For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called [NIV omits “name”] Wonderful Counselor, Mighty El, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

 

The Living Bible (TLB) goes even further and uses the phrase “royal titles” instead of “name.” Although theLiving Bible is known as a paraphrase, the translator here demonstrates the proper understanding—

 

Isa 9:6 TLB

For unto us a child is born; unto us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder. These will be his royal titles: Wonderful, Counselor, The Mighty El, The Everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.

 

As mentioned above, these are epithets, which are characterizing words or phrases accompanying or occurring in place of the name of a person or thing.

 

 

 

The doctrine of the Trinity and the doctrine of Oneness both state, in their own way, that the Son is the Almighty. For those of us who believe that Yahweh is the Father and Yahshua is His Son, two separate beings, how is this verse explained?

 

As usual, it seems, we are called upon to explain one verse which supposedly represents the Son as being the Almighty, the Father, in the face of many other plain verses which present Yahweh as the Father Almighty and Yahshua as the Son. Nevertheless, let us have a look at this.

 

Let us first of all consider the fact that the opening phrase of Isaiah 9:6 states:

 

“For unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given…”

 

Please ask yourself the following question:

 

“Since the verse says ‘a Son is given,’ who did the giving?”

 

Someone did the giving, and someone was given. Although this is easily overlooked, it is very revealing and sets the tone for the remainder of the verse.

 

In the ensuing list of epithets given to the Son, we do not run into a perceived problem until we reach “The mighty El.” Therefore, let us address this.

 

Being called El or Elohim (or mighty) is not limited to Yahweh in Scripture. For example, see Psalm 82, esp. v 6, where it is used in reference to judges. Thus, we see that elohim can be used of people who are in mighty positions of authority, but that doesn’t make them the Almighty. Yahshua too, can be considered a mighty one, an El.

 

Let us also consider the word “mighty,” which is translated from the Hebrew word gibbowr (Strong’s H1368).

 

The definition from Strong’s Dictionary is as follows:

 

mighty = H1368. gibbowr, ghib-bore'; or (short.)  gibbor, ghib-bore'; intens. from the same as H1397; powerful; by impl. warrior, tyrant.

KJV:--champion, chief, X excel, giant, man, mighty (man, one), strong (man), valiant man.

 

As shown, the Hebrew word gibbowr is defined as “powerful,” and has been translated using words such as “mighty,” “strong,” and “valiant.”

 

Taking these facts into consideration, this epithet could easily be translated “powerful El” or “strong El.”

 

By the way, gibbowr appears in Scripture more than 150 times, and in the vast majority of those occurrences, it is used in reference to man (source: Englishman’s Concordance).

 

The Article “The

 

Especially with the article “The” in the text (“The mighty God” and “The everlasting Father”) as it appears in the KJV, it makes it sound that much more to the surface reader that this text does indeed make the Son TheAlmighty Father. Many translations, however, leave out the article “the,” including the NKJV, NIV, RSV, NASB, and possibly many others. For example, here is the verse as it appears in the New King James Version(NKJV), again with the Hebrew El in place of “God”:

 

Isa 9:6 (NKJV)

For unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given; and the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty El, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

 

The Son can be (and is indeed) a mighty El. No problem. Being mighty, however, does not make Him theAlmighty.

 

 

 

Let us now turn our attention to the epithet “The everlasting Father.”

 

The Hebrew word that has been translated “everlasting” in this verse is “ad” (Strong’s H5703). Strong’s Dictionary states that this word can imply “duration.” I will state up front that the list of different ways this Hebrew word has been translated includes “eternity,” “everlasting,” and simply “old.” Ad is taken from the root word adah (H5710), meaning “to advance, i.e. pass on or continue,” etc.

 

One of the other Scriptures wherein the word ad is used is Habakkuk 3:6—

 

Hab 3:6 (NKJV)

He stood and measured the earth; He looked and startled the nations. And the everlasting mountains were scattered, the perpetual hills bowed. His ways are everlasting.

 

In the phrase everlasting mountains, “everlasting” comes from ad. Are mountains eternal? No, they were created and continue from a starting point.

 

We see from this word study that the word ad apparently can include duration of eternity, but it doesn’t have to. It can also include continuance from a starting point. It really depends upon context.

 

How did ancient Hebrew scholars understand ad as used in Isaiah 9:6? Can we know? Indeed we can. Around 250 BCE, Hebrew scholars translated the Hebrew Scriptures into Greek, known as the Septuagint (or LXX, due to the fact that about 70 scholars worked on the project). They translated the phrase in Isaiah 9:6 as follows:

 

“father of the eon about to be”

(Apostolic Bible Septuagint)

 

This seems to give the perspective that it is referring to Yahshua’s future reign in the Millennial Kingdom, an interpretation which would certainly fit the theme of this verse, as well as the following verse—

 

Isa 9:7 (NKJV)

Of the increase of His government and peace there will be no end, upon the throne of David and over His kingdom, to order it and establish it with judgment and justice from that time forward, even forever. The zeal of Yahweh of hosts will perform this.

 

Is the Son his own Father? The answer to this question should be obvious. No, He is not. The foregoing evidence shows how the Son can indeed be an everlasting Father without being the Almighty, Eternal Father.

 

 

 

Isaiah 9:6 is wrapped up with the final epithet assigned unto this Son. He is also called “Prince of Peace.” This is yet another piece of evidence within this very verse that the Son is not the Father. A prince is the son of a Father.

 

Cp Acts 5:31 (Peter speaking)

Him [i.e., Yahshua] Yahweh has exalted to His right hand to be Prince and Savior, to give repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins.

 

In the end, Isaiah 9:6 can be taken in harmony with the rest of the overwhelming* amount of verses proving that Yahweh is the Almighty and Yahshua is His Son. There is harmony here, but we have to be willing to lay down the pre-conceived notions that the Son is a second person in what is commonly called a “triune Godhead” or that He is the Father in a different mode (i.e., the Oneness doctrine).

 

* http://www.halleluyahfellowship.com/articles/trinity-oneness-and-duality

 

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