1 John 5:7-8 These Three Are One

In 1st Epistle of John 5:7 (King James Version) we find:

“For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost, and these three are one.”

As we have already seen in section 1.2.2.5, this verse is the closest approximation to what the Church calls the holy Trinity.  However, as seen in that section, this cornerstone of the Christian faith has also been scrapped from the RSV by the same thirty two Christian scholars of the highest eminence backed by fifty cooperating Christian denominations, once again all according to the “most ancient manuscripts.” 

I John 5:7 -- "
in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one." These words were added in an effort to prove the Trinitarian doctrine. It is the only expression in the King James Version of the Bible that in any way suggests a triune God, but it is spurious, so should not be accepted as part of the inspired Word.

I John 5:8 -- "
And there are three that bear witness in earth." Having added the above noted words in verse 7, the copyist evidently felt it necessary to add these words to verse 8 to make the entire passage seem more complete and reasonable.
http://www.bibletruthkeys.com/bible_translated.htm#INTERPOLATIONS, AND WHY

The early Church historian Eusebius appears to quote from a different manuscript than any we presently have. Eighteen times between the years 300 and 336-C.E. he cited Matthew 28:19, 20 as: ‘Go ye and make disciples of all the nations in my name, teaching them to observe all things, whatsoever I commanded you.'

It is interesting that the traditional Trinitarian reading of Matthew 28:19 does not appear in Eusebius' writings until after the Council of Nicaea, wherein the Trinity began to formally be held as official doctrine. So, evidence strongly indicates that this is a spurious scripture inserted by later Trinitarians, in the same vein as 1 John 5:7-8.

Check out this list of spurious (false) verses in the Bible here.

If the Holy Spirit is really a person, wouldn't the water and blood be persons too according to Trinitarian reasoning and 1 John 5:8?

Check out the wiki about 1 John 5:8 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comma_Johanneum


(Please be sure to notice the SDA commentary supports my view on this Bible text: 1 John 5:7-8)

The passage 1 John 5:7-8, is called the Johannine Comma and is not found in the majority of Greek manuscripts.

The Comma Johanneum is a comma (a short clause) contained in most translations of the First Epistle of John published from 1522 until the latter part of the nineteenth century, owing to the widespread use of the third edition of the Textus Receptus (TR) as the sole source for translation. In translations containing the clause, such as theKing James Version1 John 5:7-8 reads as follows (with the Comma in bold print):

5:7 "For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one.
5:8 And there are three that bear witness in earth, the Spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one."

The resulting passage is an explicit reference to the Trinity of FatherSon and Holy Spirit.

Griesbach's critical edition of the New Testament explaining at the footnote the reasons for the textual rejection of the Comma Johanneum.

It does not appear in the older Greek manuscripts, nor in the passage as quoted by many of the early Church Fathers. The words apparently crept into the Latin text of the New Testament during the Middle Ages, "[possibly] as one of those medieval glosses but were then written into the text itself by a careless copyist. Erasmus omitted them from his first edition; but when a storm of protest arose because the omission seemed to threaten the doctrine of the Trinity (although that doctrine had in fact been formulated long before the textual variant), he put them back in the third and later editions, whence they also came into the Textus Receptus, 'the received text'."[1]Although many traditional Bible translations, most notably the Authorized King James Version (KJV), contain the insertion, modern Bible translations such as the New International Version (NIV), the New American Standard Bible (NASB), the English Standard Version (ESV), the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) and others tend to either omit the Comma entirely, or relegate it to the footnotes. The official Latin text of the Catholic Church (a revision of the Vulgate) also excludes it.[2]

Another section of the Bible used to support the Trinity theory is in 1 John 5:7-8, The king James Version states:

"For there are three that bear record [in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost; and these three are one. And there are three that bear witness in earth], the spirit, and the water, and the blood; and these three agree in one." (1 John 5:7-8, KJV)

The oldest and most reliable Bible manuscripts do not include the words withing the brackets in the above scripture and most recognized Bible scholars do not recognize them as part of the original text. The Revised Standard Version states:

"And the Spirit is the witness, because the Spirit is the truth. There are three witnesses, the Spirit, the water, and the blood; and these three agree." (1 John 5:7-8, also see NIV, MEB, NEB, TLB, GNB, NAS)





--------------------------------SDA Bible Commentary vol.7 pg 675---------------------------

In Heaven. Textual evidence attests (cf. p. 10) the omission of the passage "in heaven, the Father, the World and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one. And there are three that bear witness in earth."
The resultant reading of vs. 7, 8 is as follows: " For there are three that bear record, the Spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one." The passage as given in the KJV is in no Greek MS earlier than the 15th and 16th centuries. The disputed words found their way into the KJV by way of the Greek text of Erasmus (see Vol. V, p. 141). It is said that Erasmus offered to include the disputed words in his Greek Testament if he were shown even on Greek MS that contained them. A library in Dublin produced such a MS (known as 34), and Erasmus included the passage in his text. Its is now believed that the later editions of the Vulgate acquired the passage by mistake of a scribe who included and exegetical marginal comment in the Bible text that he was copying. The disputed words have been widely used in support of the doctrine of the Trinity, but, in view of such overwhelming evidence against their authenticity, their support is valueless and should not be used. In spite of their appearance in the Vulgate A Catholic Commentary on the Holy Scriptures freely admits regarding these words: "It is now generally held that this passage, called the Comma Johanneum, is a gloss that crept into the text of the Old Latin and Vulgate at an early date, but found its way into the Greek text only in the 15th and 16th centuries" (Thomas Nelson and Sons, 1951, p. 1186).

8.The apostle now recapitulates his testimony, but places the Spirit at the head of the list. When Jesus was baptized, the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove bore testimony to John that the one he had baptized was the divinely appointed Messiah, and God Himself proclaimed His Son's praise. When Christ shed His blood upon the cross, His noble bearing and quiet dignity, aided by the ominous darkness and the earthquake impressed onlookers with His deity. Thus the Spirit operated with the events represented by the water and the blood to affirm that Jesus was the Son of God.

These three agree in one. Literally, "the three are for the one thing", that is, the three witnesses have the same objective in view-- to testify to Christ's divinity, that men might believe on Him and be saved.

SDA Bible Commentary vol.7 pg 675

--------------------------------SDA Bible Commentary vol.7 pg 675------------
• 1992: "Three Witnesses in Heaven" in 1 John 5:7 (original forgery in one form perhaps 5th century AD, hardened approx. 800) forged in Greek to confute Bible Scholar about 1520.  A whole Greek manuscript was forged, with an "inserted" verse, to confute a great Scripture scholar Erasmus Desiderius (1466-1536), and to bolster the Trinity dogma.  According to modern researcher Bruce M. Metzger, Erasmus had researched many old Greek manuscripts, and he deliberately kept out of the first editions of his Greek New Testament this verse in the 1st Epistle of John, 5:7:-
"For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Spirit; and these three are one."
   When its omission was protested, he said that he had not seen one Greek manuscript with that verse in.  (It had been inserted into Latin translations.)  Some time later, a Greek manuscript was supposedly unearthed (now believed to have been forged around 1520 in Oxford by a Franciscan friar named Froy or Roy) which included that verse.  In his third edition, Erasmus inserted that verse, but also footnoted his suspicions that the manuscript had been prepared to confute him. (page 101) 
   In the years since, of all the thousands of Greek manuscripts examined, only three others are known to contain this spurious passage. (p 101) 
   The passage does not appear in manuscripts of the Latin Vulgate before about A.D. 800.  Pope Leo XIII [1878-1903] ruled that it was not safe to deny it was authentic.  But modern Roman Catholic scholars recognise that it does not belong in the Greek Testament. (p 102) 
– based on The Text of the New Testament: Its Transmission, Corruption, and Restoration, by Bruce M. METZGER (Professor of New Testament Language and Literature, at Princeton Theological Seminary), Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, 3rd edition, 1992, (Dewey 225.48), pp 101-3. 
   COMPLUTENSIAN:  An interesting fact is that a superior Greek version to Erasmus's, the Complutensian of 1514, appeared after Erasmus's, which however being first and becoming known as the Textus Receptus, i.e., the "received text," and being reprinted over and over, resisted all scholarly efforts to replace it. (see pp 102-3) 
   Spurious verse 1 John 5:7 multiplied, quoted, now being reluctantly discarded.  From the corrupt Latin version (which the RCC leaders declare is "authentic") the spurious verse was forced into the CatholicDouay-Rheims English translation of the New Testament dated 1582.  Possibly because of the desire to bolster the trinity doctrine, and in spite of the warning footnote of Erasmus, it came into the English reformers' King James translation of 1611. 
   It had been and is being used to support the Trinity doctrine, including by St Thomas Aquinas, in Summa Contra Gentiles (written 1259-1264 and used in Catholic seminary training at times for centuries), Book 4, chapter 15, section 1, on page 104 in the Image Books 1957 paperback. 
   The inserted verse probably helped deceive other Christians such as the Celtic Churches of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Waldenses or Vaudois of south-central Europe who had the Bible in the ethnic language and kept the Saturday Sabbath (extermination order issued AD 1487), French bible translator Lefevre and reformer Berquin (martyred 1529), and Dr Martin Luther (1483-1546), who fought the selling of indulgences, translated the Bible into German, and was one of the most important leaders of the Reformation.  Regarding Waldenses, Lefevre and Berquin, see The Great Controversy by E.G.White, 1998, Harvestime Books, Altamont (TN, USA). 
   The defective Bible versions have continued to be stolidly reprinted in many languages and sold by groups like Bible SocietiesCatholic Truth SocietyGideons, etc. into the early 2000s.  Thankfully, it is rejected by the Wescott and Hort 1881 and other reputable Greek Testaments, and by modern multi-faith new translations. 
   The Good News Bible (GNB) (1966 and 1975) quietly removed the spurious verse 7, by giving the number 7 to the first four words of verse 8, "There are three witnesses:", and putting the number 8 to designate the rest of the old verse 8. 
   The New Jerusalem Bible (NJB) Pocket Edition (© 1985) has a similar stratagem, "So there are three witnesses," to cover this embarrassing legerdemain.  Ronald Knox's Catholic translation of 1945 had footnoted it "This verse does not occur in any good Greek manuscript.  …" (1957 ed., p N.T. 256), but neglected to say it occurred in only three out of hundreds of ancient Greek manuscripts! 
   An excellent comment about this shabby affair is given by the notes in the Emphatic Diaglot:  "This text concerning the heavenly witness is not contained in any Greek manuscript which was written earlier than the fifth century.  It is not cited by any of the Greek ecclesiastical writers; nor by any of the early Latin fathers, even when the subjects upon which they treat would naturally have led them to appeal to its authority.  It is therefore evidently spurious, and was first cited (though not as it now reads) by Virgilius Tapsensis, a Latin writer of no credit, in the latter end of the fifth century; but by whom forged, is of no great moment, as its design must be obvious to all." Link to http://www. innvista.com/ culture/ religion/ bible/compare/ trinity.htm . [COMMENT: Who could deny that it had been invented to give a "third" pro-Trinity proof text? – Religion Clarity Campaign, July 2003, revised 03 Feb 2004. COMMENT ENDS.] [Head document 1992.] 
   A change also in the preceding verse:  The Latin Vulgate translation and its dependent translations also have a spurious change in the preceding verse, 1 John 5:6.  The second part of the verse in the Roman Catholic Vulgate translation called Douay is "And it is the Spirit which testifieth that Christ is the truth."  The original could be translated "And it is the Spirit which testifieth that the Spirit is the truth."  (See the footnote on page 256 in The Holy Bible, Monsignor Ronald KNOX, 1957, Burns & Oates / Macmillan & Co, London.)  But the more natural translation is "And the spirit is that which is bearing witness, because the spirit is the truth."  (The Kingdom Interlinear Translation of the Greek Scriptures, 1969, International Bible Students Association, Brooklyn, p 1062) 
   The English reformers' King James translation has something like the correct wording.  But check it also in the NIV and Young's Literal Translation, Darby's, etc. 
   One could ask:  Why was this change from "Spirit" to "Christ" made by the Latin Church?  An internet version of the whole verse in the Vulgate Latin is at: 1 John 5:6:
hic est qui venit per aquam et sanguinem Iesus Christus non in aqua solum sed in aqua et sanguine et Spiritus est qui testificatur quoniam Christus est veritas
   The original language, Greek, has "pneuma" (i.e. "spirit") in the place where the RC Vulgate has the second "Christus". 
   Who benefited?  By the way, what does the original correct version really mean? – Religion Clarity Campaign, July 2003/Feb 2004/Apr 2004. Head document 1992.  
http://www.multiline.com.au/~johnm/religion/spurious.htm

The Son of God Became the Son of Man So that We, the Sons of Man, May Become the Sons of God

Here are 60 Bible texts which prove conclusively that Jesus was NOT GOD, but RATHER the SON of God. [If in fact He WAS God, (as trinitarians would want us to believe), He could not have really died; and the act of paying the Ransom would merely have been a hoax!]
  • Matthew 3:16-17; 8:29; 11:27; 12:18; 14:33; 16:16; 17:5; 27:54
  • Mark 5:7; 15:39
  • Luke 1:32; 8:28; 9:35; 10:22
  • John 1:18; 1:34; 1:49; 3:16; 5:19-23; 6:40; 6:69; 8:42; 10:15; 11:4; 12:49-50; 14:13; 14:23; 14:28; 16:17; 17:1-26
  • Acts 2:22-24; 3:13; 3:26; 9:20
  • Romans 1:4; 5:10; 8:13; 8:29-32
  • 1 Corinthians 11:3; 15:28
  • 2 Corinthians 1:19
  • Galatians 4:4
  • Colossians 1:13
  • 1 Thessalonians 1:10
  • Hebrews 1:2; 4:14; 5:8; 7:3; 11:17
  • 2 Peter 1:17
  • 1 John 1:3; 1:22; 3:23; 4:10; 4:14-15; 5:6; 5:11-12
  • 2 John 1:9
  • Revelation 2:8

Since these texts exist in God's Word, the Gospel story has been told over and over again. However, it could NOT be told if Jesus had really been God and the ransom had not actually ben paid! GOD CAN"T DIE!

Bible Verses Prove Trinity False

Listed below are over a hundred individual Bible verses which prove conclusively that Jesus Christ was not God, but God's Son. I urge all sincere Christians to examine their own Bibles as to the accuracy of this information.
  • Matthew 3:16-17; 8:29; 11:27; 12:18; 14:33; 16:16-17; 17:5; 27:54
  • Mark 5:7; 15:39
  • Luke 1:32; 1:35; 8:28; 9:35; 10:22
  • John 1:13; 1:18; 1:34; 1:49; 3:16; 5:19-23; 5:37; 6:40; 6:69; 8:18; 8:42; 10:15; 10:36; 11:4; 12:49-50; 14:13; 14:23; 14:28; 16:17; 17:1-16; 20:17; 20:31
  • Acts 2:22-24; 3:13; 3:26; 9:20
  • Romans 1:4; 5:10; 8:29
  • 1 Corinthians 11:3; 15:28
  • 2 Corinthians 1:19
  • Galatians 4:4
  • Philippians 2:9
  • Colossians 1:13
  • 1 Thessalonians 1:10
  • 1 Timothy 2:5
  • Hebrews 1:2; 2:9; 4:14; 5:7-8
  • 1 Peter 1:3
  • 2 Peter 1:17
  • 1 John 1:3; 2:22; 3:23; 4:10; 4:14-15; 5:11-12
  • 2 John 1:9
  • Revelation 2:18

Biblical Proof?

You may be asking, “Could all the churches of the world be wrong about God?” If you are not yet pondering this, you probably will soon. Eventually, everyone must squarely face this fundamental question with an open mind—and then be willing to face the facts from the Bible.

Although some scholars openly acknowledge that there is no biblical proof for the trinity, most professing Christians either overlook or know nothing of such admissions, and choose to “accept on faith” as biblical truth what is asserted from the pulpit.

But is it?
Remember, the term “trinity” is found nowhere in Scripture. Nor are the phrases “three-in-one, triune god” or any similar term. Let’s establish this as an admission from trinitarians:

“The term ‘Trinity’ is not a Biblical term, and we are not using Biblical language when we define what is expressed by it as the doctrine” (“Trinity,” International Standard Bible Encyclopedia).

Harper’s Bible Dictionary adds this: “The word [Trinity] does not occur in the Bible…The formal doctrine of the Trinity as it was defined by the great church councils of the fourth and fifth centuries is not to be found in the NT [New Testament]” (pp. 1098-1099).

But proponents of the trinity attempt to base their belief on a handful of passages, taken completely out of context and misapplied. Let’s examine them for their correct meaning.

I John 5:7-8
The “strongest” scripture used to support the trinity is I John 5:7-8. It states: “For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Spirit: and these three are one. And there are three that bear witness in earth, the spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one.”

Then wouldn't the water and blood be persons too according to Trinitarian reasoning and 1 John 5:8?

1 John 5:8: "For there are three who bear witness [and, interestingly, this is the only place in the entire Bible we find a 'trinitarian' formula that even mentions the word 'three'!], The Spirit [which is God according to trinitarians], and the water, and the blood: and the three [are] in one." - ASV.

Sadly for Trinitarians, this is by far the clearest "Trinitarian" statement in the entire Bible! It is the only one that even mentions "three". 

And still the formula of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit is absent. Rather, these three "persons" who are equally God are the Spirit, the water, and the blood! 

Of course an honest, clear statement of the Trinity Doctrine would be:

"For there are three persons who compose the only true God: The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. And these three persons are the One God."

It isn't a difficult statement for anyone to write, let alone an inspired Bible writer. But you will never see even that in the inspired scriptures.

Therefore, this clearest of trinitarian "proofs" (1 John 5:8) shows "conclusively" that if the Holy Spirit is God, His two equal partners are not Jesus and Jehovah, but the "persons" of "the Holy Water" and "the Holy Blood".

Certainly such "evidence" is absolutely ridiculous. However, it is an excellent example of how the very best trinitarian "proofs" are tragically worthless. (Jer. 16:19 - KJV, ASV, RSV, NASB, JPS)

We might also look at the "three-in-one" aspects of 1 John 5:8. It would be best to use most modern Bible translations here since the King JamesVersion has been proven to have spurious material added at 1 John 5:7 (even trinitarian scholars freely admit this).

If Matt. 28:19 adds up to three things being equally one God, then 1 John 5:8, which includes the Spirit, is a much more certain proof of a three-in-one God! There's only one slight problem: the two other "persons" who are equally one with the Spirit have unexpected "names"! - "And it is the Spirit that beareth witness, because the Spirit is the truth." - 1 John 5:7 ASV. The Spirit is God, trinitarians say, and, being a person He can bear witness here. But let's read on:

"For there are three who bear witness [this is the only place in the entire Bible we find a 'trinitarian' formula that even mentions the word 'three'!], The Spirit [which is God according to trinitarians], and thewater, and the blood: and the three [are] in one." - ASV.

This is by far the clearest "trinitarian" statement in the entire Bible!! It is the only one that even mentions "three" (although we could work in other numbers like "seven" at Rev. 4:5 or "four" at Rev. 4:6 which has 4 living creatures "in the midst of" God's throne, we can't find any use of three). And to top it all off it says "the three are in one." (The ASV renders "agree in one," but the word "agree" is not really found in the Bible manuscripts here. It literally says "the three are in one." - Compare the MLB: "the three are one.")

And who are these three equal "persons" (who bear witness) who are equally the holy spirit (since the three are all "in one"), who, according to trinitarians, is God? Why these three "persons" who are equally God are the Spirit, the water, and the blood! (Notice how verse 9 also shows that these three are "really" God: the witness of these three is really the witness of God!)


At first glance, this passage appears to directly prove the trinity. Could this scripture be revealing that God is a trinity? Was it inspired by God so that mankind would understand who and what He is?

Here are the plain facts of this verse: Transcribers who believed in the trinity concept—but who could find no scriptural support—added the bold italicized words to support their beliefs. Get this! They are pure human invention! Those who use these verses to support the trinity doctrine are either unaware that the passage was altered, or they are aware but feel that their use serves a “greater good.”

Most Bible margins directly state the truth of the passage. For example, the New King James Version margin states, “NU, M [versions] omit the rest of v. 7 [after “record”] and through on earth of v. 8, a passage found in Greek in only four or five very late mss. [manuscripts].”

The Critical and Experimental Commentary says of this section that the verse was not found in the Latin Vulgate until the eighth century. The New Interpreter’s Bible states, “This verse in the KJV is to be rejected…It appears in no ancient Greek MS [manuscript].”

Here is what Adam Clarke’s Commentary, written by an avowed trinitarian, states, “But it is likely that this verse is not genuine. It is wanting [missing] in every MS. [manuscript] of this epistle written before the invention of printing, one excepted, the Codex Montifortii, in Trinity College, Dublin: the others which omit this verse amount to one hundred and twelve.”

Clarke continues, “It is wanting in both the Syriac, all the Arabic, Ethiopic, the Coptic, Sahidic, Armenian, Slavonian, etc., in a word, in all the ancient versions but the Vulgate; and even of this version many of the most ancient and correct MSS. have it not. It is wanting also in all the Greek fathers; and in most even of the Latin.”

The Correct Translation—And Meaning
These verses should properly read, “There are three that bear record: the SPIRIT, and the WATER, and the BLOOD: and these three agree as one.”

We must ask: What is the meaning of “three that bear record”? To “bear record” or “bear witness” is to attest or testify to something. When a witness testifies in a courtroom, he is telling “the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.” Therefore, these three elements of the conversion process “attest” to the fact that a person is indeed a Christian.

This works in the following way:
(1) SPIRIT: Romans 8:16-17 states this: “The SPIRIT ITSELF bears witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God. And if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with Him, that we may be also glorified together.” Verse 9 continues, “But you are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of His.”

It is by the receiving of the Holy Spirit that one is begotten by the Father. With this Spirit then dwelling in the mind, a person can begin to understand God’s Word and His Plan: “For what man knows the things of a man, save the spirit of man which is in him? even so the things of God knows no man, but the Spirit of God” (I Cor. 2:11).

(2) WATER: The death and burial symbolized by WATER baptism, preceding true conversion, is the means by which Christians show God their willingness to live a new life, to “put off…the old man” (Eph. 4:22; Gal. 2:20; Rom. 6:4-6) and walk “in newness of life.” It also demonstrates faith in Christ’s death and resurrection.

(3) BLOOD: It is the BLOOD of Christ that cleanses people from their past sins (Rom. 5:9; Eph. 1:7;2:13; Col. 1:14; Heb. 9:12) upon repentance and baptism. 

Matthew 28:19
In Matthew 28:19, Christ gave His apostles the instruction to “[baptize] in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” Scholars and theologians have universally misunderstood the meaning of this instruction.

We must ask: What does this scripture actually mean? Does it validate the trinity? First, let’s understand some basics of the verse. It is clear that all three have a name—but a name does not make something a person. People name all kinds of things—mountains, buildings, pets, cars, boats, planes, estates, companies, inventions and many more. The point is that just because there is a name for all three, this does not mean that all three are persons or personalities.
What does it mean to be baptized in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit? This is not difficult. The Father and Son have a name and the Holy Spirit conveys or bears that name to His children.
Let’s understand the baptism process more clearly.

The disciples were to baptize in the name of the Father, because it is the Father “of whom the whole family in heaven and earth is named” (Eph. 3:15). In other words, the Father is the Head of the house—the family—and families traditionally carry the name of the father. Also, it is God’s (the Father’s) goodness that leads one to the recognition and repentance of his sins (Rom. 2:4).

The apostles were instructed to baptize in the name of the Son, because His death, in our stead, makes salvation possible (Rom. 5:8; II Pet. 3:9).

What about “In the Name…of the Holy Spirit”?
But they were also to baptize in the name of the Holy Spirit, because the Father uses that Spirit—His Spirit—as the power through which the begettal is performed (Rom. 8:16).

This is what the passage means! God gives Christians His Holy Spirit, which is His seed. When they receive that seed, it gives them God’s name—they become heirs with Jesus Christ. From the point of conversion, Christians carry the name of God. When understood, this is why the name of the true Church has always been the “Church of God.” The word “Church” (Greek: ekklesia) literally means “the called out ones”—human beings are called out of the world, begotten as God’s children, put into His Church and given His name.

Note what John said about the “seed” within converted people: “Whosoever is born of God does not commit sin; for His seed remains in him: and he cannot sin, because he is born of God” (I John 3:9). The Greek word for “seed” is sperma, from which comes the English word “sperm.” The Holy Spirit is the “sperm” or “seed” of God.

Notice another scripture, adding light to what the seed of God is: “Seeing you have purified your souls in obeying the truth through the Spirit unto unfeigned love of the brethren, see that you love one another with a pure heart fervently: being born again [begotten], not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which lives and abides forever” (I Pet. 1:22-23).

While Christians will ultimately be born again into the kingdom of God at the resurrection, they are, at conversion, BEGOTTEN of God through the Holy Spirit. This is similar to the human reproductive system. As soon as the sperm of a father attaches to the egg of the mother, a child is conceived. The child is not yet born, although he is begotten of the physical seed—the father’s sperm. We, once we have received the Holy Spirit—the seed of God—are begotten in this life, but not yet born! Like any human father who would say that his wife is carrying his child, God speaks of the Church—described as the “Mother” of Christians (Gal. 4:26; Heb. 12:22; Rev. 12)—as carrying His children.

So then, does Matthew 28:19 establish the trinity? Clearly not! It simply reveals that when we are baptized, we are given God’s name through His Spirit.
Romans 8:9

Let’s further examine the begettal process before returning to other scriptures. Notice Romans 8:9: “But you are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of His.” This passage represents what could be called the Christian “DNA test.” Everyone recognizes that one must have a man’s genes to be his biological child. God is the same. Without God’s Spirit, one cannot be His begotten child.

We can understand more about the process of spiritual begettal by examining the actual process of human begettal. In reproduction, an egg must be fertilized by a sperm cell, which then “seals off” the egg. The egg can never be fertilized by another sperm.

Now consider. Romans 8:9 spoke of Christians receiving in the same begettal the Spirit of God and the Spirit of Christ. Are these two different Spirits—yet, Christ said, “I and My Father are One” (John 10:30)? If they were two different spirits, this still would not validate the trinity. It would mean that there are four, not three, beings—God and His Spirit and Christ and His Spirit—in the Godhead.

Upon baptism and the laying on of hands (the point at which one receives the Holy Spirit), Christians are begotten by the Father, just as Christ was begotten in Mary’s womb by the Father. Once they are begotten, Christ lives in them (Gal. 2:20). At that point, they have the spirit of both Christ and the Father dwelling in them—which are one and the same Spirit. It is through this Spirit that Christians take on the mind of Christ (Phil. 2:5).

It is important to recognize that a Christian can, however, “abort” in this lifetime—if he does not continue in the right path. It is possible to lose the Holy Spirit, and bring the new begotten life to an end. Notice: “For it is impossible for those who were once enlightened, and have tasted of the heavenly gift, and were made partakers of the Holy Spirit, and have tasted the good word of God, and the powers of the world to come, if they shall fall away, to renew them again unto repentance; seeing they crucify to themselves the Son of God afresh, and put Him to an open shame” (Heb. 6:4-6).

Comma Johanneum

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The Comma Johanneum is a comma (a short clause) contained in most translations of the First Epistle of John published from 1522 until the latter part of the nineteenth century, owing to the widespread use of the third edition of the Textus Receptus (TR) as the sole source for translation. In translations containing the clause, such as the King James Version, 1 John 5:7-8 reads as follows (with the Comma in bold print):

5:7 "For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one.
5:8 And there are three that bear witness in earth, the Spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one."

The resulting passage is an explicit reference to the Trinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

It does not appear in the older Greek manuscripts, nor in the passage as quoted by many of the early Church Fathers. The words apparently crept into the Latin text of the New Testament during the Middle Ages, "[possibly] as one of those medieval glosses but were then written into the text itself by a careless copyist. Erasmus omitted them from his first edition; but when a storm of protest arose because the omission seemed to threaten the doctrine of the Trinity (although that doctrine had in fact been formulated long before the textual variant), he put them back in the third and later editions, whence they also came into the Textus Receptus, 'the received text'."[1] Although many traditional Bible translations, most notably the Authorized King James Version (KJV), contain the insertion, modern Bible translations such as the New International Version (NIV), the New American Standard Bible (NASB), the English Standard Version (ESV), the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) and others tend to either omit the Comma entirely, or relegate it to the footnotes. The official Latin text of the Catholic Church (a revision of the Vulgate) also excludes it.[2]

--------------------------------SDA Bible Commentary vol.7 pg 675---------------------------

In Heaven. Textual evidence attests (cf. p. 10) the omission of the passage "in heaven, the Father, the World and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one. And there are three that bear witness in earth."
The resultant reading of vs. 7, 8 is as follows: " For there are three that bear record, the Spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one." The passage as given in the KJV is in no Greek MS earlier than the 15th and 16th centuries. The disputed words found their way into the KJV by way of the Greek text of Erasmus (see Vol. V, p. 141). It is said that Erasmus offered to include the disputed words in his Greek Testament if he were shown even on Greek MS that contained them. A library in Dublin produced such a MS (known as 34), and Erasmus included the passage in his text. Its is now believed that the later editions of the Vulgate acquired the passage by mistake of a scribe who included and exegetical marginal comment in the Bible text that he was copying. The disputed words have been widely used in support of the doctrine of the Trinity, but, in view of such overwhelming evidence against their authenticity, their support is valueless and should not be used. In spite of their appearance in the Vulgate A Catholic Commentary on the Holy Scriptures freely admits regarding these words: "It is now generally held that this passage, called the Comma Johanneum, is a gloss that crept into the text of the Old Latin and Vulgate at an early date, but found its way into the Greek text only in the 15th and 16th centuries" (Thomas Nelson and Sons, 1951, p. 1186).

8.The apostle now recapitulates his testimony, but places the Spirit at the head of the list. When Jesus was baptized, the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove bore testimony to John that the one he had baptized was the divinely appointed Messiah, and God Himself proclaimed His Son's praise. When Christ shed His blood upon the cross, His noble bearing and quiet dignity, aided by the ominous darkness and the earthquake impressed onlookers with His deity. Thus the Spirit operated with the events represented by the water and the blood to affirm that Jesus was the Son of God.

These three agree in one. Literally, "the three are for the one thing", that is, the three witnesses have the same objective in view-- to testify to Christ's divinity, that men might believe on Him and be saved.

SDA Bible Commentary vol.7 pg 675

--------------------------------SDA Bible Commentary vol.7 pg 675------------


1 John 5:7 (Johannine Comma) - "These Three Are One"

"For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one."

"I and the Father Are One"


THAT text, at John 10:30, is often cited to support the Trinity, even though no third person is mentioned there. But Jesus himself showed what he meant by his being "one" with the Father. At John 17:21, 22, he prayed to God that his disciples "may all be one, just as you, Father, are in union with me and I am in union with you, that they also may be in union with us, . . . that they may be one just as we are one." Was Jesus praying that all his disciples would become a single entity? No, obviously Jesus was praying that they would be united in thought and purpose, as he and God were.—See also 1 Corinthians 1:10.

Jesus preaching
Jesus prayed to God that his disciples might "all be one," just as he and his Father "are one"

At 1 Corinthians 3:6, 8, Paul says: "I planted, Apollos watered . . .He that plants and he that waters are one." Paul did not mean that he and Apollos were two persons in one; he meant that they were unified in purpose. The Greek word that Paul used here for "one" (hen) is neuter, literally "one (thing)," indicating oneness in cooperation. It is the same word that Jesus used at John 10:30 to describe his relationship with his Father. It is also the same word that Jesus used at John 17:21, 22. So when he used the word "one" (hen) in these cases, he was talking about unity of thought and purpose.

Regarding John 10:30, John Calvin (who was a Trinitarian) said in the book Commentary on the Gospel According to John: "The ancients made a wrong use of this passage to prove that Christis . . . of the same essence with the Father. For Christ does not argue about the unity of substance, but about the agreement which he has with the Father."

Right in the context of the verses after John 10:30, Jesus forcefully argued that his words were not a claim to be God. He asked the Jews who wrongly drew that conclusion and wanted to stone him: "Why do you charge me with blasphemy because I, consecrated and sent into the world by the Father, said, 'I am God's son'?" (John 10:31-36, NE) No, Jesus claimed that he was, not God the Son, but the Son of God.

The passage is called the Johannine Comma and is not found in the majority of Greek manuscripts.

"God" & only "God" AKA The Father was "God" thus it can be noted that Ellen White could compare the unity Jesus had with His Disciples as the exactly the same unity Jesus and the Father had. 

Real Bible: John 10:30 "I and the Father are one [in unity of purpose]." Trinity Version: I and the Father are one [God]. When Trinitarians interpret John 10:30, why do they also ignore John 17:22 where Jesus prays his disciples will be one "just as we are one." Is it because this would completely nullify their claims?

Is Jesus God?

Proclaimers of the Trinity theory use John 1:1 as their strongest proof that Jehovah and Jesus are one and the same: "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God." (John 1:1, KJV)

And, on the surface, this statement seems to be a rather straight forward explanation of the relationship of God and Jesus. However, truth does not arise from single Bible verses taken out of context or blindly accepted without research and study.

The Greek manuscripts of John 1:1 show that the Greek definite article is used to distinguish Jehovah as "the God" from his Son which is "a God." The authoritative Bible scholar, Benjamin Wilson, gives the correct translation: "In a beginning was the Word, and the Word was with the God, and a god was the word." (John 1:1, DGT)

Another section of the Bible used to support the Trinity theory is in 1 John 5. The king James Version states:

"For there are three that bear record [in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost; and these three are one. And there are three that bear witness in earth], the spirit, and the water, and the blood; and these three agree in one." (1 John 5:7-8, KJV)

The oldest and most reliable Bible manuscripts do not include the words withing the brackets in the above scripture and most recognized Bible scholars do not recognize them as part of the original text. The Revised Standard Version states:

"And the Spirit is the witness, because the Spirit is the truth. There are three witnesses, the Spirit, the water, and the blood; and these three agree." (1 John 5:7-8, also see NIV, MEB, NEB, TLB, GNB, NAS)

Many Bible Verses Prove Jesus Was Not God

There is a direct statement about Jesus being the Son of Jehovah in the Psalms: "...He said to me, 'You [Jesus] are my son, today I [Jehovah] have begotten you." (Psalm 2:7)

Jehovah spoke to Jesus, in His pre-human existence, concerning the creation of Adam and Eve: "Then God said, 'Let us make man in our image, after our likeness ....'" (Genesis 1:26)

There were plans, from the beginning, to make Jesus a human as shown in Deuteronomy: "...he [Jehovah] will raise up for you a Prophet [Jesus] like me [Moses], an Israeli, a man to whom you must listen and whom you must obey." (Deuteronomy 18:15, TLB; see also Acts 3:22)

During His ministry on Earth, Jesus stated that He taught not His own wisdom, but that of His Father, Jehovah: "For I have not spoken on my own authority; the Father who sent me has himself given me commandment what to say and what to speak." (John 12:49)

There are a large number of Bible verses which can be used to prove that Jesus was not God, but the Son of God. The chapter of this thesis, "VII. Bible Verses Prove Trinity False", lists over a hundred such texts.

The Bible, therefore, teaches that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. Jehovah said He would send His Son and Jesus made the statement that Jehovah was His Father. The Apostles taught these facts. The Bible does not teach that Jesus was Jehovah and neither Jesus nor His followers claimed otherwise.

Subpages (1): Trinity Proof Texts
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